Falling Whistles Interns Blog
Falling Whistles gives a small window into our world’s largest war. Originally just a journal written about boys sent to the frontlines of war armed with only a whistle, readers forwarded it with the same kind of urgency with which it was written and demanded to know – what can we do? The Falling Whistles campaign launched with a simple response - make their weapon your voice and be a whistleblower for peace in Congo. Falling Whistles asks that people read the story and buy the whistle. Proceeds will help restore the lives of war-affected kids.

DECEMBER 10th in GOMA

A GLOBAL MOMENT OF UNITY FOR PEACE IN CONGO
Last December, when the M23 rebels left the city of Goma, our partners at MutaaniCongo’s fastest growing radio station—threw together a concert to celebrate. They put out an invitation on the airwaves, and with only three days’ notice, 2000 Gomatreciens came out to hear their favorite musicians and party the night away. 

This year, they’re doing it again, and we’re doing it with them. On Human Rights Day, December 10, 2013, we will gather in 5 cities around the world Goma, Stockholm, New York, Los Angeles, Phoenix, and Miamifor a Global Moment of Unity for Peace in Congo. Together, we will celebrate the progress made toward growing human freedom. 
The night will begin in Goma at the main stage of the Ihusi Hotel, where Mutaani will unveil its new record label, showcase musicians from across the African continent, and begin building the path to lasting peace. 
At the same time in Stockholm, all-day festivities at the Bruno Gallerian Mall culminate in live performances and DJ sets at nightclub Lljunggren. Later in Miami, it all goes down at the Rec Room, an underground old-school spot at South Beach’s Gale Hotel. In Phoenix, the crew takes over one of the city’s best music venues for a concert/art show/dance party. Along with New York and LA, all of these cities will be connected through an interactive hub: a large HD projection that lets them see each-other through social media, photos, videos and more. Guests can send their content to the hub by using the hashtag #freeworld. 
Not in one of those six cities? Not to worry. This year the global moment will also be in Austin, Portland, Berlin, Seoul, Seattle, Bowling Green, Orlando, Edmonton, Las Vegas, and any other city where you’re ready to host something. 
Register here to start your own Human Rights Day event or to receive an invite to a happening in your city. 
Fifty years ago, Patrice Lumumba said the Congolese would rule “not by the peace of guns and bayonets, but by a peace of the heart and will.”  
This is Congo Week and today all around the world individuals are celebrating the legacy of Lumumba.  You can learn more about what is happening in your town or at your school here,
http://www.congoweek.org/

Fifty years ago, Patrice Lumumba said the Congolese would rule “not by the peace of guns and bayonets, but by a peace of the heart and will.”  

This is Congo Week and today all around the world individuals are celebrating the legacy of Lumumba.  You can learn more about what is happening in your town or at your school here,

http://www.congoweek.org/

Falling Whistles: Profile: Fashion Accelerating on Runaways

fallingwhistles:

New York City Fashion Week for designers and fashionistas meant being inspired and getting a headstart on fashion trends. The seven day extravagant, that came to a close last week, was adorned with previews of designers spring and summer 2014 collections.

We couldn’t help but to notice a

Falling Whistles: Mutaani FM for FW: Justin Kasereka Justkas

fallingwhistles:

This is a guest post straight from Goma by Mutaani’s Guy Zihindula.

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This week we discovered a young artist named Justin Kasereka Justkas. He was was born and raised in Goma, but left for a time to study at L’Académie des Beaux Arts in Kinshasa, Congo’s capital. He recently returned…

Falling Whistles: International Literacy Day: Unlocking Potential in Congo

fallingwhistles:

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Photo: George Malaika Foundation

Early education is the cornerstone for developing independent human potential. Our foundational childhood education sets the stage for our future. Today is International Literacy Day, an important reminder of where the future, begins.

At Falling…

fallingwhistles:

Delivered fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King’s iconic “I Have A Dream” speech marks a pivotal point in the Civil Rights Movement and an unforgettable moment in American history. The words Dr. King spoke on August 28, 1963 created a language and a blueprint for the years that followed, leaving a powerful legacy that reverberates to this day.  
The March on Washington challenged over one million people to disarm their bitterness and hatred. Congregated, marching, and listening, King urged millions to “rise,” “lift our nation,” and “make justice.” For many, the speech became the empowering doctrine that voiced their own unspoken thoughts. King’s dream became bigger than any one life.
What can we at Falling Whistles learn from this speech?  How can we follow in King’s footsteps, to voice a dream of equal weight and impact for the 21st century? 
Looking at both King’s Dream and FW’s vision, we see that neither is confined by easy or immediate possibilities. King’s speech invokes a strong urgency for something to happen, to forge a new tomorrow—a call to action that can’t be ignored. King’s legacy is to accept a process of social change that’s not simple to undergo, but possible.
If FW were to craft such a speech, it would need to follow the same passion, courage, and tonality as King’s. It should inspire those who hear it to rise, lift, and make justice. It would need to reach rebels, corporations that work with conflict minerals, cell phone users, Congo’s president, America’s president, the United Nations, the Congolese, Congo’s neighbors, all of Africa, calling on them to be of “physical force with soul force” while deadly injustice is imposed on fellow human beings.
Today, we are inspired in understanding that MLK’s dream reflects the same creed in which Falling Whistles dreams for peace in Congo. Like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., we, Falling Whistles, have a dream.
If you wrote a dream speech for peace in Congo, what would you say?
by Umba Peggy Monga
Welcome Umba to the crew. We found her blog Congo Logie and she found us on Facebook. She came to the office, started hanging around, became a leader of a Whistler Society and told us she wouldn’t leave. So here we are. Now she’s rolling. Let’s go. Welcome her to the fam and follow her on Twitter @U_M_B_A.

fallingwhistles:

Delivered fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King’s iconic “I Have A Dream” speech marks a pivotal point in the Civil Rights Movement and an unforgettable moment in American history. The words Dr. King spoke on August 28, 1963 created a language and a blueprint for the years that followed, leaving a powerful legacy that reverberates to this day.  

The March on Washington challenged over one million people to disarm their bitterness and hatred. Congregated, marching, and listening, King urged millions to “rise,” “lift our nation,” and “make justice.” For many, the speech became the empowering doctrine that voiced their own unspoken thoughts. King’s dream became bigger than any one life.

What can we at Falling Whistles learn from this speech?  How can we follow in King’s footsteps, to voice a dream of equal weight and impact for the 21st century?

Looking at both King’s Dream and FW’s vision, we see that neither is confined by easy or immediate possibilities. King’s speech invokes a strong urgency for something to happen, to forge a new tomorrow—a call to action that can’t be ignored. King’s legacy is to accept a process of social change that’s not simple to undergo, but possible.

If FW were to craft such a speech, it would need to follow the same passion, courage, and tonality as King’s. It should inspire those who hear it to rise, lift, and make justice. It would need to reach rebels, corporations that work with conflict minerals, cell phone users, Congo’s president, America’s president, the United Nations, the Congolese, Congo’s neighbors, all of Africa, calling on them to be of “physical force with soul force” while deadly injustice is imposed on fellow human beings.

Today, we are inspired in understanding that MLK’s dream reflects the same creed in which Falling Whistles dreams for peace in Congo. Like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., we, Falling Whistles, have a dream.

If you wrote a dream speech for peace in Congo, what would you say?

by Umba Peggy Monga

Welcome Umba to the crew. We found her blog Congo Logie and she found us on Facebook. She came to the office, started hanging around, became a leader of a Whistler Society and told us she wouldn’t leave. So here we are. Now she’s rolling. Let’s go. Welcome her to the fam and follow her on Twitter @U_M_B_A.

Falling Whistles: MeLo-X.

peaceincongo:

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MeLo X is renaissance man: Artist, MC, DJ, Producer, Audio Engineer, Photographer, Filmmaker. His style is crazy, never not fresh, recognized from Brooklyn to Burundi. Amongst wild headgear, draping chains, beads and ropes, around his neck you’ll almost always find a whistle.

“I’ll…

Falling Whistles: The Letter to Feingold.

peaceincongo:

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Yesterday morning, Falling Whistles joined 17 other advocacy groups in signing an open letter to newly appointed Special Envoy to the Great Lakes Region, Senator Russ Feingold.

The letter was published by the Enough Project, and referenced in a Politco opinion piece

Falling Whistles: We Got the Envoy.

peaceincongo:

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When JFK wanted to stave off the Cold War, he sent his brother Bobby to Moscow as a Special Envoy.

When the American revolutionaries needed more troops, they sent Benjamin Franklin to France as a Special Envoy.

Two years ago, 24,000 whistleblowers, 77 Congolese